FOUNDRY 45s

Record45
Insights from learning and development leaders
from around the world.

Season 2

Christopher Lind_Foundry 45s

S2E01 - Christopher Lind

Learning Sharks and GE Healthcare

Q: What is a common misconception about how L&D has evolved in 2020?

A: So, this is a really good question, and it's a common misconception that people think about me a lot, because I'm "the digital guy" or "the tech guy". And that misconception is that: moving forward, everything's going digital. All we're going to have is digital, and in-person, like getting together in person is dead. I think that is actually a misconception. I think what's going to happen with 2020 is — we have a unique opportunity to actually reimagine what is the best way to do the things that we need to do, and then let's design around that. Let's not go from one box to the other, let's say: "What are we trying to accomplish?" And then, "What's the best way to do it?" And what technology is allowing us to do is whatever we need do the best way possible. 

Amir

S2E02 -Amir Khorram

Learning Sharks and GE Healthcare

Q: What type of headset do you think is the best solution for VR training?

A: That's a great question Dave. So, at HTC Vive, we've invested a lot of time and strategy growing our enterprise hardware solutions, and initially going down the path of PC VR, it's been really important for training in scenarios where precision and optics is really the optimal goal. But, looking at where the state of the world and the of business has gone over the last year, year-and-a-half, the all-in-one space and being able to deploy hardware and various training solutions to a variety of locations has really been key and really helped keep businesses moving forward through everything that they've been facing. 

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S2E03 - Todd Mattson

TriMet Transit

Q: Why is VR a good solution for training rail operators?

A: Hi, Dave. VR provides several benefits. In our case here at TriMet, for our training, we occasionally run into problems with getting equipment, and we have weather events that sometimes prevent us from going out and operating on the mainline or in the yard. So, it provides solutions to operational challenges that we face. It's become more of a problem with the pandemic and the uncertainty that it's brought into our operations. In addition to that, there's certain experiences that are hard to replicate in real life, and VR gives us an opportunity to do that in a safe environment where we can observe the operator.

Jon Bowers

S2E04 - Jon Bowers

UPS

Q: Is traditional L&D dead? If not, should it be?

A: That's a great question, and I would definitely have to say no. And this coming from someone who deals primarily with learning and technology. I think L&D in all forms right now is more relevant and important to success in business than it has been ever before. And, when I speak about "now", I'm not just talking about now in terms of the pandemic. I'm talking about now in kind of a broader scale, where we really have three major trends that are affecting how L&D can be extremely important to an organization. The first one is transformation. If you think about any major organization right now, they are going through, have just come out of, or about to go into some form of transformation. And for me, L&D really is change management. That's how you're able to communicate to people the changes of your transformation. The second is an evolving workforce. People are looking at work completely differently than they ever have before. So really, to attract talented people who are really hungry to learn, create, and push the status quo, our learning has got to encourage a growth mindset. So, whatever medium we're able to get that through, or modality, it's really important that we use it. 

Season 1

Carolyn Dickerson1

S1E01 - Carolyn Dickerson

Westrock Company

Q: How do you expect VR to change or impact L&D from a corporate perspective?

A: So, we believe that implementing VR or using VR for training will give us much more data than we've had in the past. We have this idea of time to proficiency, and right now, we kind of guess how long it takes to get a new employee to a proficiency skill level where they don't have any defects in their work, and they don't have any safety violations. Once we get that type of information, it will just open up a whole new spectrum of ideas. We will be able to see where are our gaps, or where are we doing very well in the skills area. We're like any other business, and we have limited resources, so this will help us see where we need to put our time, energy, and effort.

Brandon Carson

S1E02 - Brandon Carson

Delta Air Lines

Q: Is traditional L&D dead? If not, should it be?

A: It is not dead. I think it should be dead from certain angles if you take a really good look at it. So, no, not at all. And yes, it should, I think is the answer. I do think we are finding ourselves in an inflection point, however. We need to be more strategic, and we need more access to the business strategy. I like to think of L&D now as a practice versus a profession, and we need to be a component in the overall strategy. We need to be closer to where the decisions are made. Right now, too many of us are too far downstream from where those decisions are made. In today's world, where continuous learning, upskilling and re-skilling the workforce is very important and critical for business evolution, we need to have a seat at the table where those decisions are being made.

Jon Bowers

S1E03 - Jon Bowers

UPS

Q: What is a common misconception people have about how L&D is evolving in 2020?

A: I call this “the magic pill fallacy”. There's this belief or desire that there's one training event or one training modality that's going to solve all of our problems, educate an entire workforce, and improve the bottom line. Of course, that dismisses how people learn and forces learning into this box of isolated trainings rather than an educational experience. It does a little more than really check the box, and it makes learning an outcome and not really a behavior. For the audience, it proves to make that experience this kind of disconnected and irrelevant type of training, and it really doesn't stick. So, we really need better design of learning tracks. We need to educate our leadership on outcome and ultimately maybe a bit more patience on the way that we consume our training.

Kevin Marcum

S1E04 - Kevin Marcum

Delta Air Lines

Q: Where do you see training organizations getting the most value out of deploying VR?

A: I see Delta getting the most value out of VR by allowing our agents to practice on aircrafts and different simulations. Currently, our aircrafts are only there for a short period of time, and that does not give him a lot of practice time. By conducting virtual reality that gives them practice time over and over.

Yi Breneman

S1E05 - Yi Breneman

The Learning Brand

Q: Where do you see training organizations getting the most value out of deploying VR?

A: For large complex organizations, using VR for training allows employees to participate and practice in 3D without spending a ton of money on physical equipment and trainers. Besides technical skills, VR can also be used for soft skills, and a cultural diversity related training with a virtual element of remote coaching. Participants can practice handling challenging situations using VR in a safe environment. This is especially relevant when you have multiple global locations and folks who work from home. Regardless of location or time zone, VR can ensure that a training environment is consistent, resulting in a more proficient workforce.

Brandon Carson

S1E06 - Brandon Carson

Delta Air Lines

Q: Where do you see training organizations getting the most value out of deploying VR?

A: When we look at VR, we're looking at when is the training condition best for this type of immersive experience — when it's hard to replicate, when it's expensive to recreate and when it's unsafe. So, it's common that in the airline space, we have those three conditions, one or the other, quite frequently. So, we're going to be looking at VR as a key component in our strategy, because it's rare that we get an airplane we can train on that's just reserved for training purposes, for example. So, it's hard to replicate a lot of the situations around and in an aircraft. Obviously, it would be expensive, so VR will be a key strategic choice for us when trying to build out immersive experiences that are as authentic as possible.

Foundry 45 Jeff Carpenter

S1E07 - Jeff Carpenter

Caveo Learning

Q: Where do you see training organizations getting the most value out of deploying VR?

A: Really looking at VR and how it fits into the tool kit of L&D, I would say I would focus primarily on things that are very tactical and spatial. So, when you look at how you can teach somebody a really minute, tiny, mechanical kind of engineering type of thing, I think initially that's where we're going to see the biggest bang. So, in medical, engineering, manufacturing, things like that, where people have to really understand, and the down times of taking some of the machinery or things offline it's really going to be the best bet to use this technology in the near future.

Caolyn Foundry 45s

S1E08 - Carolyn Dickerson

Westrock Company

Q: What opportunities do you see to use technology to develop your team skills?

A: One of the skillsets we are looking at are the skillsets of our leaders. We're trying to move our thinking from looking at leadership skills as a soft skill into a technical skill. Once we do that, we can then create scenarios and situations that allow managers to practice. If they practice, can they put themselves in the place of their employees, to get a sense of how their decisions impact their team's ability to be productive? And can they also get some intelligence about what their leadership skills really are. Then they can see where they sit on the spectrum, and start to develop themselves even more. When we get a sense for where we sit with our leadership teams, that just lifts up everyone.

Christopher Lind_Foundry 45s

S1E09 - Christopher Lind

Learning Sharks and GE Healthcare

Q: What are the biggest challenges you are currently experiencing with your training programs?

A: I'll narrow it down to one that I think is probably at the root of all the issues that I see coming out of it. And that one is our ability, both internal, with our stakeholders, whether it's L&D, business stakeholders, or whoever you're talking about, is our ability to step outside this box of what we've known. This is at the forefront of all these challenges, because we have a hard time stepping outside of that and saying: what if those rules didn't exist? How would we do things? Because the reality is: tech is allowing us to do all these things that we've never been able to do before, yet we keep walking back into what I call the Stockholm Syndrome of L&D. It continues to be a challenge for us to actually step outside that box, and reimagine the possibilities.

Jon Bowers

S1E10 - Jon Bowers

UPS

Q: What are the biggest challenges with your current training programs?

A: It really is just the old adage of time and money. So, when it comes to money, it’s defining a quantifiable ROI to our senior leadership. We can all agree that training is the right thing to do, but how much and what we get out of it, is always the question that we're trying to justify. And that's not just me. I mean, there are studies that show only 8% of leaders really understand the impact of L&D, and really only 4% of those see a clear ROI. So, the first is defining a quantifiable ROI. The second one is time. It goes hand in hand with ROI, but dedicating time to learn is something that is a challenge for us. We have to be smarter with our delivery these days more than ever before. Our audiences are seeing higher demand for their time. They have to gather more information or learn more information and assimilate that information and utilize it quicker than they ever have before.

Kevin Marcum

S1E11 - Kevin Marcum

Delta Air Lines

Q: Is traditional L&D dead? If not, should it be?

A: It’s a tough question. I would say there's a place for the classroom environment. But, alongside that, I would say there's a place for the classroom environment beside actual simulation training such as virtual reality, where the agents can go in and get a classroom environment training and then immediately do hands-on practice using virtual reality. That's where I see the benefit of any L&D training.

Jeff Carpenter

S1E12 - Jeff Carpenter

Caveo Learning

Q: Is traditional L&D dead? If not, should it be?

A: Interesting question. I think as the coronavirus has come in, it's really made people take a step back and look at, really, what their strategy has been, and how they're looking at their L&D and supporting their end customers. I think a lot of people were really thinking that their strategy was appropriate, given the business environment. Since then, it has really exposed their short-term thinking of what they were trying to accomplish in L&D. And instead, it has had everybody take a step back and really relook at it saying: how can we get content? How can we get education and learning to people wherever and whenever they need it?

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S1E13 - Maxime Ros

REVINAX

Q: Where do you see training organizations getting the most value out of deploying VR?

A: Well, deploying VR helps to save time, money, and even lives, according to the different applications you can have. Where you can have the best value is when it's applied in our industry to experiential learning. Meaning: when there is a need to live an experience to get the full comprehension of the situation and of its consequences.